Can anything other than the sun cause skin cancer?

Can anything other than the sun cause skin cancer? Can anything other than the sun cause skin cancer?, Is it possible to get skin cancer without sun exposure?, What triggers skin cancer?, What is the greatest risk factor for skin cancer?, What can be mistaken for skin cancer?

Can anything other than the sun cause skin cancer?

Smoking: Smokers are more likely to develop squamous cell skin cancers, particularly on the lips. Chemical exposure: Certain chemicals, including arsenic, industrial tar, coal, paraffin and certain types of oil, may increase the risk for certain types of non-melanoma skin cancers.

Is it possible to get skin cancer without sun exposure?

Smoking: Smokers are more likely to develop squamous cell skin cancers, particularly on the lips. Chemical exposure: Certain chemicals, including arsenic, industrial tar, coal, paraffin and certain types of oil, may increase the risk for certain types of non-melanoma skin cancers.

What triggers skin cancer?

However, melanomas can also occur in people, even where there isn't any obvious family history. It is possible a small proportion of melanomas unrelated to sun might also arise because of factors like viruses, chemicals and environmental pollutants.

What is the greatest risk factor for skin cancer?

Most skin cancers are caused by too much exposure to ultraviolet (UV) rays. To lower your risk of getting skin cancer, you can protect your skin from UV rays from the sun and from artificial sources like tanning beds and sunlamps. What Screening Tests Are There?

What can be mistaken for skin cancer?

Sun exposure.

Exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation from the sun plays a major role in the development of skin cancer. People who live at high altitudes or in areas with bright sunlight year-round have a higher risk of developing skin cancer.


What does Stage 1 skin cancer look like?

Stage 1 skin cancer can vary in appearance depending on the type of skin cancer. Generally, it appears as a small growth or sore with a pearly or waxy appearance. It may also look like a red, scaly patch or a pink or flesh-colored bump.

What are the 7 warning signs of skin cancer?

Basal cell carcinoma usually grows very slowly and often doesn't show up for many years after intense or long-term exposure to the sun.

How can you tell if a spot is skin cancer?

While the UV rays from sunlight are a well-known cause of those changes, other factors can contribute to your risk of melanoma. For example, your genes and family medical history increase the likelihood of you developing melanoma. Other risk factors include having: Fair skin.

Can you have skin cancer for years and not know?

Overall, the lifetime risk of getting melanoma is about 3% (1 in 33) for White people, 0.1% (1 in 1,000) for Black people, and 0.5% (1 in 200) for Hispanic people. But each person's risk can be affected by a number of factors, which are described in Risk Factors for Melanoma Skin Cancer.

What is the survival rate for skin cancer?

[1-4] In contrast to most cancer types, melanoma skin cancer also occurs relatively frequently at younger ages. Age-specific incidence rates increase steadily from around age 20-24 and more steeply in males from around age 55-59. The highest rates are in in the 85 to 89 age group for females and males.

Can you get melanoma without sun exposure?

Skin cancers rarely hurt and are much more frequently seen than felt. Develop a regular habit of checking your skin for new spots and changes to existing freckles or moles.

What are my odds of getting skin cancer?

Some basal cell carcinomas may appear as raised, pink or red, translucent, shiny, pearly bumps that may bleed after a minor injury. They may have a lower area in their center, and blue, brown, or black areas. Know the signs and symptoms of basal cell carcinoma.

What age is skin cancer most common?

Seborrheic keratosis causes discolored, slightly raised patches on the skin. Seborrheic keratosis and melanoma can look similar. However, while these patches may resemble signs of skin cancer, they are harmless. Seborrheic keratoses are noncancerous skin growths that can look a lot like melanoma.